Paprika Pork

As January is firmly over the horizon and we are all quickly running out of February, it becomes harder to cling on to that New Year’s “I’m going to be a health nerd” commitment that you promised you’d stick to this year.

It’s not so much the snacks (energy balls!) or the breakfasts (overnight oats!) but dinners that become a struggle. You’ve had a hard day at work, you just about managed to get yourself to the gym to make that monthly fee worthwhile and you still have to cook and eat.

We had the same problem the other week, but stumbled over this recipe. Parpika pork.

It ticked all the boxes. It was quick (30 minutes), easy (mostly throwing things in a pan) and cheap (pork, veg and spices). Plus it was delicious.

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Ingredients (serves 4)

600g Pork loin (any other pork should also do though)
300g Mushrooms, sliced
2 Small onions, halved then thinly sliced
2 tbsp vegetable oil
1.5 tbsp smoked paprika
2 tbsp corn flour
3 tbsp tomato purée
250ml stock (from one chicken stock cube)
4 tbsp sour cream
Boiled rice

Directions

Add half the oil to a large pan over a medium high heat, then throw in the pork. Let it sizzle around a bit. Maybe wiggle the pan to make yourself look more pro. Once it’s all stopped being pink on the outside, pop it in a big bowl, juice and all.

Now is a good time to do your rice. We follow this foolproof Delia recipe to make sure it’s perfect.

Add the other half of the oil to the pan, then add the onions. Do something else for 3 minutes while they soften. Maybe read another review? When you come back they’ll be all soft and lovely – unless you cut them too thick, then shame on you, go read another review…

Throw in your mushrooms. Stir every now and again for about 7-8 minutes. Once the mushrooms have wilted and darkened, it’s time to put the pork back. Juice and all. Stir around until it’s hot again.

Add the paprika, chicken stock and tomato purée, give it a good old stir and then simmer for 5 minutes.

Mix the cornflour with 3 tablespoons of cold water to make a little gloopy paste, then add to the pan and stir to thicken your sauce. If you found that the sauce was thick enough, don’t bother adding the cornflour unless you want your dinner to have the consistency of meaty toothpaste.

Bring to the boil, remove from the heat, then stir in your sour cream. Serve with the awesomely cooked rice and shovel into your face. Hmmm.

Nutrition
Per serving (quarter of recipe, without rice)

Calories 300

Total fat 11g
Saturated: 3.1g
Polyunsaturated: 2.4g
Monounsaturated: 5.0g
Trans/hydrogenated: 0.0g
Cholesterol 82.8mg
Sodium 486.6mg
Potassium 265.9mg
Total carbs 9.0g
Fibre: 1.4g
Sugars: 2.9g
Protein 39.8g
Vitamin A 1.8%
Vitamin C 6.2%
Calcium 2.7%
Iron 5.2%

Is it clean?
Depending on your definitions, this can be considered a clean meal. The ingredients you may take umbridge with are the corn flour and the stock cube. Corn flour is the starch extracted from corn. While corn is ok, the extraction means it’s refined/processed. The nutrients are zero and there isn’t any rubbish in it, but it goes against the ethos of “clean”. Same goes for the stock cubes. Usually it is just dried from regular stock and seasoned, so it’s up to you as to whether it ticks your box or not!

I adapted this recipe from one my wife found in a recent Asda magazine, but I changed a few things (more paprika, more pork, fewer mushrooms) to make it nicer!

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Pavillon Ledoyen Truffles

Chocolates. Everyone loves them, right? Right. So when I was offered to be sent some luxury Parisian truffles I umm’d and ahh’d for about never and bit their arm off.

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The one-armed people in question are Pavillon Ledoyen. They are a company that create elegant macaroons  chocolates, biscuits, coffees, teas, champagnes, spirits, foie gras and many other gourmet specialties, in order to provide you with the best of Paris.

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I was sent the truffles, all natural and dusted with cocoa powder.

While the $34.00 (£21.64) price tag will put off most, Pavillon Ledoyen certainly do their best to make you feel like they’re worth it. They arrive in a well crafted decorative box (right), that my wife is keen to keep for make-up storage, housing a golden packet in which hides the truffles.

Once you get past the elegant packaging, the truffles themselves are immensely luxurious. They’re rich and velvety, taking you from the bitter cocoa dusting to a buttery middle before giving you a light chocolaty aftertaste. They’re very rich, leaving you with a thought that is rare with most chocolate products: “I could only eat two of those”.

They would certainly make a nice treat for a special lady in your life, as they really are something very different from your classic Milk Trays and Lindor balls. They feel like they’d suit a special anniversary, alongside a trip to the country and a bottle of champagne. (He says having tried them at home, with a tea and Glee on the telly…)